Zithromax 1gm

By: asermak Date: 05-Feb-2019
Azithromycin MedlinePlus Drug Information

Azithromycin MedlinePlus Drug Information

I’d like to say I discovered this hot spot through vigorous sexual activity, but sadly, it was actually through research, while I was reading about the other three. Well, lo and behold, we ladies also have an A-Spot. Up until a week ago, I thought there were only three: The clitoris, the G-Spot, and the U-Spot. So, without further delay, here is a description of what each hot spot is, where it is located and how it can be stimulated through foreplay, sex and toys. Clitoris This is the most sensitive spot on the female body. It’s located at the top of the vulva, where the inner labia join at their upper ends. The visible part is the tiny, nipple-sized, female equivalent of the tip of the penis, and is partially covered by a hood. Part of the clit is hidden beneath the surface and extends down to the vaginal opening. Though this can be stimulated through a vibrator (the deep vibrations are able to reach underneath), it is less sensitive than the tip, which can be stimulated through foreplay and intercourse. Generic Name: Azithromycin (multiple manufacturers) Common Brand Name: Zithromax (Pfizer — U. S.) Popularity: 11th most commonly prescribed drug between 2002 — 2007 (U. S.) Class: Macrolide antibiotic Treatment Uses — For treatment of bacterial infections. Azithromycin has distinct advantages over earlier macrolides such as erythromycin that include better tolerance, better tissue penetration and more favorable pharmacokinetics. Because azithromycin can be dosed once daily, it improves patient compliance — a leading cause of antibiotic failures. Macrolides act primarily against streptococci and staphylococci, and are often used to treat these bugs in patients intolerant of penicillins. The therapeutic uses for azithromycin are broad and continually changing.

Rainbows Festival – Phoenix Pride

Rainbows Festival – Phoenix Pride

HOW TO USE THIS MEDICINE: It is preferable to take this medicine with food to avoid stomach upset. Do not take antacids such as Maalox within two hours of taking this medication. If you vomit within 1 hour after taking medication, you will need to be re-treated. SIDE EFFECTS: You may get nausea, stomach pain, vaginal irritation or rash. If these side effects do not go away or get worse, or if you notice other side effects not listed above, check with your doctor. Do not have sex for seven days after taking this medication. Tell your sex partner(s) to be tested and/or treated, whether they have symptoms or not. If you have unprotected sex with your partner and they have not been treated, you can get this infection again. If you have more questions about chlamydia or other sexually transmitted infections visit our website at org and or contact your health care provider. If these effects are mild, they may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they’re more severe or don’t go away, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency. Serious side effects can include: If you have an allergic reaction, call your doctor or local poison control center right away. If your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. Don’t take this drug again if you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to it. Disclaimer: Our goal is to provide you with the most relevant and current information.

<i>ZITHROMAX</i> azithromycin 250 mg and 500 mg Tablets and. - FDA

ZITHROMAX azithromycin 250 mg and 500 mg Tablets and. - FDA

500 mg PO once, then 250 mg once daily for 4 days 2 g extended release suspension PO once 500 mg IV as single dose for at least 2 days; follow with oral therapy with single dose of 500 mg to complete 7-10 days course of therapy Infection of pharynx, cervix, urethra, or rectum: Ceftriaxone 250 mg IM once plus azithromycin 1 g PO once (preferred) or alternatively doxycycline 100 mg PO q12hr for 7 days CDC STD guidelines: MMWR Recomm Rep. June 5, 20(RR3);1-137 Agitation Allergic reaction Anemia Anorexia Candidiasis Chest pain Conjunctivitis Constipation Dermatitis (fungal) Dizziness Eczema Edema Enteritis Facial edema Fatigue Gastritis Headache Hyperkinesia Hypotension Increased cough Insomnia Leukopenia Malaise Melena Mucositis Nervousness Oral candidiasis Pain Palpitations Pharyngitis Pleural effusion Pruritus Pseudomembranous colitis Rash Rhinitis Seizures Somnolence Urticaria Vertigo Anaphylaxis Angioedema Anorexia Bronchospasm Constipation Dermatologic reactions Dyspepsia Elevated liver enzymes Erythema multiforme Flatulence Oral candidiasis Pancreatitis Pseudomembranous colitis Pyloric stenosis, rare reports of tongue discoloration Stevens-Johnson syndrome Torsades de pointes Toxic epidermal necrolysis Vomiting/diarrhea, rarely resulting in dehydration Neutropenia Elevated bilirubin, AST, ALT, BUN, creatinine Alterations in potassium Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) Use with caution in abnormal liver function, hepatitis, cholestatic jaundice, hepatic necrosis, and hepatic failure have been reported, some of which have resulted in death; discontinue azithromycin immediately if signs and symptoms of hepatitis occur Injection-site reactions can occur with IV route In treatment of gonorrhea or syphilis, perform susceptibility culture tests before initiating azithromycin therapy; may mask or delay symptoms of incubating gonorrhea or syphilis. Bacterial or fungal superinfection may result from prolonged use Prolonged QT interval: Cases of torsades de pointes have been reported during postmarketing surveillance; use with caution in patients with known QT prolongation, history of torsades de pointes, congenital long QT syndrome, bradyarrhythmias, or uncompensated heart failure; also use with caution if coadministering with drugs that prolong QT interval or proarrhythmic conditions (eg, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia); elderly patients may be more susceptible to drug-associated effects on QT interval Pneumonia: PO azithromycin is safe and effective only for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to C pneumoniae, H influenzae, M pneumoniae, or S pneumoniae Cases of Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) reported; despite successful symptomatic treatment of allergic symptoms, when symptomatic therapy was discontinued, allergic symptoms recurred soon thereafter in some patients without further azithromycin exposure; if allergic reaction occurs, the drug should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted; physicians should be aware that allergic symptoms may reappear when symptomatic therapy discontinued Endocarditis prophylaxis: Indicated only for high-risk patients, per current AHA guidelines Use caution in renal impairment (Cr Cl Because of the low levels of azithromycin in breastmilk and use in infants in higher doses, it would not be expected to cause adverse effects in breastfed infants (Lact Med; https://nih.gov/newtoxnet/lactmed.htm) Binds to 50S ribosomal subunit of susceptible microorganisms and blocks dissociation of peptidyl t RNA from ribosomes, causing RNA-dependent protein synthesis to arrest; does not affect nucleic acid synthesis Concentrates in phagocytes and fibroblasts, as demonstrated by in vitro incubation techniques; in vivo studies suggest that concentration in phagocytes may contribute to drug distribution to inflamed tissues Y-site: Amikacin, aztreonam, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, droperidol, famotidine, fentanyl, furosemide, gentamicin, imipenem, cilastatin, ketorolac, levofloxacin, morphine, piperacillin-tazobactam, ondansetron(? ), potassium chloride, ticarcillin-clavulanate, tobramycin The above information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only. Individual plans may vary and formulary information changes. Contact the applicable plan provider for the most current information. To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Zithromax (azithromycin) and other antibacterial drugs, Zithromax (azithromycin) should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. ZITHROMAX (azithromycin capsules, azithromycin tablets and azithromycin for oral suspension) contain the active ingredient azithromycin, an azalide, a subclass of macrolide antibiotics, for oral administration. Azithromycin has the chemical name ( 2R,3S,4R,5R,8R,10R,11R,12S,13S,14R ) -13-[(2,6-dideoxy-3- C -methyl-3- O -methyl-(alpha)- L - ribo -hexopyranosyl)oxy]-2-ethyl-3,4,10-trihydroxy-3,5,6,8,10,12,14-heptamethyl-11-[[3,4,6-trideoxy-3-(dimethylamino)-(beta)- D - xylo -hexopyranosyl]oxy]-1-oxa-6-azacyclopentadecan-15-one. Azithromycin is derived from erythromycin; however, it differs chemically from erythromycin in that a methyl-substituted nitrogen atom is incorporated into the lactone ring. Its molecular formula is C O and a molecular weight of 785.0. ZITHROMAX capsules contain azithromycin dihydrate equivalent to 250 mg of azithromycin. The capsules are supplied in red opaque hard-gelatin capsules (containing FD&C Red 40).

Read Provider HCPCS-NDC Crosswalk 012408
Read Provider HCPCS-NDC Crosswalk 012408

Readbag users suggest that Provider HCPCS-NDC Crosswalk 012408 edited v10is worth reading. The file contains 147 pages and is free to view, download or print. A single 1 gram dose of azithromycin is equally effective against Chlamydia trachomatis as 100 milligrams of doxycycline taken twice daily for.

Zithromax 1gm
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