Lasix iv administration

By: partnerka240 Date: 05-Feb-2019
FUROSEMIDE FUROSEMIDE INJECTION, USP INJECTION. - FDA

FUROSEMIDE FUROSEMIDE INJECTION, USP INJECTION. - FDA

The expected shelf life of Brackett elements stored in their original packaging and out of direct sunlight is as follows: 4 years from date of manufacture listed on the front of element packaging. (EX: MFG MONTH/YEAR) This allows the element to be installed on an aircraft at the end of its shelf life. Elements with Orange Text on bags (sample) are no longer usable. 3D CRT: Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy? AAAAA: Aphasia, agnosia, apraxia, agraphia, and alex? ABVD: Adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, and dacarbazine? AC: Adriamycin [doxorubicin] plus cyclophosphamide? ADEPT: Adalimumab Effectiveness in Psoriatic Arthritis Trail? ADME: Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion? AGUS: Atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance?

Emergency Medicine EducationAn Evidence-Based.

Emergency Medicine EducationAn Evidence-Based.

Algi DERM is manufactured from seaweed and is recommended for infected wounds because it is an exudate absorber. Medication administered below the skin surface is intradermal administration. According to the manufacturer, it does absorb exudates, but it is best for wounds with moderate drainage. Most people prefer the chest, flank, or upper arm areas. The back of the knee is not suitable for applying medication because of the joint motion and difficulty of keeping a dressing in place. Between the molar teeth and cheek is the buccal area. The conjunctival sac is between the eyelids and eyeball. Sublingual medications are rapidly absorbed into systemic circulation because of the increased blood flow to these areas and avoid the first pass effect of the liver where extensive metabolism usually takes place. These routes do not contain drug effects to the oral area and they bypass the liver. The use of Montgomery tapes or a binder reduces the irritation of nearby skin tissue. The dressing should be packed into the wound loosely. The dressings should be wrung out to prevent dripping. hypokalemia; hypochloremic alkalosis; asymptomatic hyperuricemia; fluid and electrolyte imbalances, including dilutional hyponatremia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia; hyperglycemia; impaired glucose tolerance. daily in morning, with second dose given in 6 to 8 hours, carefully adjusted up to 600 mg daily, p.r.n. Use cautiously in pregnant women, patients with sulfa allergy, and in those with hepatic cirrhosis. Duration of action is 6 to 8 hours after oral administration and about 2 hours after I. Contraindicated if increased azotemia, oliguria, or progressive renal disease occur during therapy. Diuresis begins in 30 to 60 minutes and peaks 1 to 2 hours after oral administration. Excretion: About 50% to 80% of a dose is excreted in urine; plasma half-life is about 30 minutes. Contraindicated in patients hypersensitive to drug and patients with anuria, hepatic coma, or severe electrolyte depletion. Increased by 20 mg q 2 hours until desired response is achieved. Food delays oral absorption but doesn’t alter diuretic response. administration within 5 minutes and peaks in 20 to 60 minutes. Absorption: About 60% of a dose is absorbed from the GI tract after oral administration. Antihypertensive action: This drug effect may be the result of renal and peripheral vasodilatation and a temporary increase in glomerular filtration rate and a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance.

Dilution Furosemide <i>Lasix</i> ® - GlobalRPH

Dilution Furosemide Lasix ® - GlobalRPH

The parenteral administration of furosemide is indicated in cases where oral administration is not feasible or not efficient (for example in case of reduced intestinal absorption) or when a quick effect is required. To achieve optimum efficacy and suppress counter-regulation, a continuous furosemide infusion is generally to be preferred to repeated bolus injections. Where continuous furosemide infusion is not feasible for follow-up treatment after one or several acute bolus doses, a follow-up regimen with low doses given at short intervals (approx. 4 hours) is to be preferred to a regimen with higher bolus doses at longer intervals. Generally, Furosemide should be administered intravenously. Intramuscular administration must be restricted to exceptional cases where neither oral nor intravenous administration is feasible. It must be noted that intramuscular injection is not suitable for the treatment of acute conditions such as pulmonary oedema. In the absence of conditions requiring a reduced dose (see below) the initial dose recommended for adults and adolescents over 15 years, is of 20 mg to 40 mg furosemide by intravenous (or in exceptional cases intramuscular) administration; the maximum dose varying according to individual response. In either case, the rate of infusion should not exceed 4mg/minute. Edema associated with congestive heart failure (CHF), liver cirrhosis, and renal disease, including nephrotic syndrome 20-80 mg PO once daily; may be increased by 20-40 mg q6-8hr; not to exceed 600 mg/day Alternative: 20-40 mg IV/IM once; may be increased by 20 mg q2hr; individual dose not to exceed 200 mg/dose Refractory CHF may necessitate larger doses Excessive diuresis may cause dehydration and electrolyte loss in elderly; lower initial dosages and more gradual adjustments are recommended (eg, 10 mg/day PO)Increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and loss of sodium may cause confusion in elderly; monitor renal function and electrolytes Anaphylaxis Anemia Anorexia Diarrhea Dizziness Glucose intolerance Glycosuria Headache Hearing impairment Hyperuricemia Hypocalcemia Hypokalemia Hypomagnesemia Hypotension Increased patent ductus arteriosus during neonatal period Muscle cramps Nausea Photosensitivity Rash Restlessness Tinnitus Urinary frequency Urticaria Vertigo Weakness Toxic epidermal necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, erythema multiforme, drug rash with eosinophila and systemic symptoms, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, exfoliative dermatitis, bullous pemphigoid purpura, pruritus Agent is potent diuretic that, if given in excessive amounts, may lead to profound diuresis with water and electrolyte depletion Careful medical supervision is required; dosing must be adjusted to patient's needs Use caution in systemic lupus erythematosus, liver disease, renal impairment Concomitant ethacrynic acid therapy (increases risk of ototoxicity) Risks of fluid or electrolyte imbalance (including causing hyperglycemia, hyperuricemia, gout), hypotension, metabolic alkalosis, severe hyponatremia, severe hypokalemia, hepatic coma and precoma, hypovolemia (with or without hypotension) Do not commence therapy in hepatic coma and in electrolyte depletion until improvement is noted IV route twice as potent as PO Food delays absorption but not diuretic response May exacerbate lupus Possibility of skin sensitivity to sunlight Prolonged use in premature neonates may cause nephrocalcinosis Efficacy is diminished and risk of ototoxicity increased in patients with hypoproteinemia (associated with nephrotic syndrome); ototoxicity is associated with rapid injection, severe renal impairment, use of higher than recommended doses, concomitant therapy with aminoglycoside antibiotics, ethacrynic acid, or other ototoxic drugs To prevent oliguria, reversible increases in BUN and creatinine, and azotemia, monitor fluid status and renal function; discontinue therapy if azotemia and oliguria occur during treatment of severe progressive renal disease FDA-approved product labeling for many medications have included a broad contraindication in patients with a prior allregic reaction to sulfonamides; however, recent studies have suggested that crossreactivity between antibiotic sulfonamides and nonantibiotic sulfonamides is unlikely to occur In cirrhosis, electrolyte and acid/base imbalances may lead to hepatic encephalopathy; prior to initiation of therapy, correct electrolyte and acid/base imbalances, when hepatic coma is present High doses ( 80 mg) of furosemide may inhibit binding of thyroid hormones to carrier proteins and result in transient increase in free thyroid hormones, followed by overall decrease in total thyroid hormone levels In patients at high risk for radiocontrast nephropathy furosemide can lead to higher incidence of deterioration in renal function after receiving radiocontrast compared to high-risk patients who received only intravenous hydration prior to receiving radiocontrast Observe patients regularly for possible occurrence of blood dyscrasias, liver or kidney damage, or other idiosyncratic reactions Cases of tinnitus and reversible or irreversible hearing impairment and deafness reported Hearing loss in neonates has been associated with use of furosemide injection; in premature neonates with respiratory distress syndrome, diuretic treatment with furosemide in the first few weeks of life may increase risk of persistent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), possibly through a prostaglandin-E-mediated process Excessive diuresis may cause dehydration and blood volume reduction with circulatory collapse and possibly vascular thrombosis and embolism, particularly in elderly patients Increases in blood glucose and alterations in glucose tolerance tests (with abnormalities of fasting and 2 hour postprandial sugar) have been observed, and rarely, precipitation of diabetes mellitus reported Patients with severe symptoms of urinary retention (because of bladder emptying disorders, prostatic hyperplasia, urethral narrowing), the administration of furosemide can cause acute urinary retention related to increased production and retention of urine; these patients require careful monitoring, especially during initial stages of treatment Hypokalemia may develop with furosemide, especially with brisk diuresis, inadequate oral electrolyte intake, when cirrhosis is present, or during concomitant use of corticosteroids, ACTH, licorice in large amounts, or prolonged use of laxatives Pregnancy category: C; treatment during pregnancy necessitates monitoring of fetal growth because of risk for higher fetal birth weights Lactation: Drug excreted into breast milk; use with caution; may inhibit lactation Loop diuretic; inhibits reabsorption of sodium and chloride ions at proximal and distal renal tubules and loop of Henle; by interfering with chloride-binding cotransport system, causes increases in water, calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride Solution: Fructose10W, invert sugar 10% in multiple electrolyte #2 Additive: Amiodarone (at high concentrations of both drugs), buprenorphine, chlorpromazine, diazepam, dobutamine, eptifibatide, erythromycin lactobionate, gentamicin(? ), isoproterenol, meperidine, metoclopramide, netilmicin, papaveretum, prochlorperazine, promethazine Syringe: Caffeine, doxapram, doxorubicin, eptifibatide, metoclopramide, milrinone, droperidol, vinblastine, vincristine Y-site: Alatrofloxacin, amiodarone (incompatible at furosemide 10 mg/m L; possibly compatible at 1 mg/m L), chlorpromazine, ciprofloxacin, cisatracurium (incompatible at cisatracurium 2 mg/m L; possibly compatible at 0.1 mg/m L), clarithromycin, diltiazem, diphenhydramine, dobutamine, dopamine, doxorubicin (incompatible at furosemide 10 mg/m L and doxorubicin 2 mg/m L; possibly compatible at furosemide 3 mg/m L and doxorubicin 0.2 mg/m L), droperidol, eptifibatide, esmolol, famotidine(? ), fenoldopam, gatifloxacin, gemcitabine, gentamicin(? ), hydralazine, idarubicin, labetalol, levofloxacin, meperidine, metoclopramide, midazolam, milrinone, morphine, netilmicin, nicardipine, ondansetron, quinidine, thiopental, vecuronium, vinblastine, vincristine, vinorelbine Not specified: Tetracycline Additive: Cimetidine, epinephrine, heparin, nitroglycerin, potassium chloride, verapamil Syringe: Heparin Y-site: Epinephrine, fentanyl, heparin, norepinephrine, nitroglycerin, potassium chloride, verapamil(? ), vitamins B and C Injection: Inject directly or into tubing of actively running IV over 1-2 minutes Administer undiluted IV injections at rate of 20-40 mg/min; not to exceed 4 mg/min for short-term intermittent infusion; in children, give 0.5 mg/kg/min, titrated to effect Use infusion solution within 24 hours The above information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only. Individual plans may vary and formulary information changes. Contact the applicable plan provider for the most current information.

Chapter 8 Percutaneous <strong>Administration</strong> My Nursing Test Banks -.
Chapter 8 Percutaneous Administration My Nursing Test Banks -.

Chapter 8 Percutaneous Administration Test Bank MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. A patient has an infected wound with large amounts of drainage. Which type of dressing would the. DRUG PROTOCOL DISCLAIMER. By following the links below, you are acknowledging that you have read and understood the disclaimer below. All guidelines and protocols.

Lasix iv administration
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